Mythologically Inspired

Japanese mythology has always fascinated me, every since I was introduced to the game Okami when I was younger. Recently, I have been on a bit of a learning adventure, researching connections between the game itself and the mythology of the culture it references so heavily.

I am nowhere near being done learning, and I do not act as though I am an expert.

However, through browsing wiki pages, books, words of mouth, so on and so forth, I have been falling more and more in love with every piece that I gather.

A particular interest to me has been Takamagahara, the dwelling place of the Kami (essentially gods). From the information I have found, when creation began, light, floaty elements became Takamagahara, while the heavy elements became Earth. But the elements did not come from nothing. Every source that I have found describes these elements to have come from nothing more than chaos.

This particular idea is simply beautiful to me, as a non-religious, open-to-ideas person with a strange fascination with concepts such as chaos. While chaos can be considered a scientific creationism term (looking at you, high school physics class, I remember the teacher throwing that word around to make the subject cool), the idea of it as a more spiritualistic entity is far more appealing,

especially in the aspect of storytelling.

Any time I am learning of myths and legends such as these, it leads me to grow curious in how to create a story involving such fascinating characters, stories, and entities. Yet the more time that goes on, I worry that with references to Norse mythology in Marvel, the novel American Gods by Neil Gaiman, and a multitude of other stories that I am sure I have never been introduced to, I worry that it would be near impossible to find a modern, fresh spin on the stories of gods and creations.

Still, I cannot help but try.

After all, with stories so hauntingly beautiful, can I be blamed for wanting to run with it in my own way, after being so greatly inspired?

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